We hear tales of advertisers maligning one another by instigating malicious rumours about their competitors’ products, which they insinuate as being deadly in physical content or being imbued with demonic powers. They even go to the extent of employing ‘pastors’ and juju men to sow fear in the minds of gullible Nigerians. Very often the company’s logo or trademark is interpreted as demonic. It happened to the Queen of the Coast Sardines, Eleganza Pen and Indomie Noodles, with various levels of success; The Queen of the Coast Sardines has never fully recovered from the maliciously instigated fall from grace in the Nigerian market; their Mermaid logo! Of course, the dreaded queen of the undersea underworld is a mermaid! Google ‘Queen of the Coast Sardines’ and see some URL examples of such warped, morbid mentality disguised as religion. It’s 2017 and Nigerians still believe that anything that is published or broadcast is true. There’s a good side to

It’s 2017 and Nigerians still believe that anything that is published or broadcast is true. There’s a good side to this though: Advertised brands, no matter their actual brand status, seem to move up a notch just by being advertised. Somehow, Nigerians still believe that a mere appearance in media substantiates the brand’s claims. This portends good returns on Ads but, on the other hand, such gullibility means that competitors with malicious intent could have their way while maligned brands suffer unjustly and sometimes go under. It’s near impossible to track the perpetrators and almost hopeless to convince Nigerians otherwise once the false accusation has been made. The only solution is to fight back through re-branding, more publicity, demos, lectures and advertisements, which counter the rumours, and hope that the damage hasn’t gone too far. There’s hope for the maligned, if done right, after all, Indomie noodles is just too good to have been brought down and has weathered malicious rumours eminently.